communicate

Exploring student perspectives at QUT’s School of Communication: Georgia Andersen

By T.J. Thomson/ Media and Communication
Learn about advertising and public relations student Georgia Andersen's experience at Australia’s top-ranked School of Communication.

In 2018, QUT’s School of Communication launched its newly developed Bachelor of Communication degree allowing students to enroll in any of its five study areas: Digital Media, Media and Entertainment Industries, Journalism, Professional Communication, and Advertising and Public Relations.

Additionally, students in select study areas can pursue double degrees in business, information technology, justice, law, science, nutrition science, and public health, allowing them greater career flexibility and additional post-graduation options.

The Creative Industries Faculty, in which the School of Communication is housed, hosts more than 7,500 students. Of these, more than 10% are internationals and 63% are women. In 2019, QUT’s School of Communication was recognised as the country’s best and the 16th best worldwide. Beyond these statistics, though, what’s it like to be a student in our School?

Image by Dr T.J. Thomson, FHEA

“Studying communication at QUT has given me the opportunity to participate in practical learning activities necessary to launch my career.”

Q: What attracted you to QUT/The School of Communication?

The flexibility of the communication degree was a strong motivator for me choosing to study at QUT. Through selecting majors, minors and complementary study units, you can customise the communication degree to suit your interests and career goals. This was really important to me as it ensures that my studies are relevant to who I am and where I want to go.

Q. What skills or experiences learnt here will you take with you beyond the university?

Throughout my studies at QUT, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with students from diverse backgrounds and disciplines. Learning to work effectively as a team and utilise peoples’ unique insights to achieve the successful delivery of a project is a skill that I will take with me beyond the university – particularly as I look to enter a highly collaborative work environment such as the creative industries.

Q. What advice do you have for students who want to study here?

My advice to future QUT students would be to treat university as an investment in yourself and to make the most of the opportunities available to you. There are so many opportunities offered to students at QUT which will allow you to grow both academically and personally. These include case competitions, events, clubs and societies, networking opportunities, overseas exchange programs and study tours. By making an effort to get actively involved you will be sure to get the most out of your university experience.

Q. What’s something you’ve learnt here that would be difficult to learn on your own or elsewhere?

Throughout my degree, my lecturers and tutors have often placed emphasis on the value of using creativity to solve problems. This has pushed me to forgo straightforward thinking and consider unique perspectives to arrive at a solution. As a result, I have been able to develop my lateral thinking skills. I believe this will serve me well in all areas of life, but particularly as a communication student looking to enter an industry where innovation is necessary for survival.


Hopefully these insights will provide a better perspective into what it’s like to be a student at Australia’s top-ranked School of Communication. If you’ve already completed a bachelor’s degree and are interested in further study and up-skilling your career, consider our newly launched Master of Digital Communication course or a doctoral-level qualification.